Impact

At the end of the day, when you are desigining or implementing a Diversity and Inclusion strategy, you will need to make an impact. These are the stories and data that show how the resources at Practical Diversity and Inclusion has made a difference.

Impact stories on Diversity and Inclusion

The Capability Maturity Model for Diversity in Organisations was used as a framework to setup the initial committee for the Research Software Engineering community in Australia and New Zealand. The end result of this was that for a community that was overwhelmingly male (91% male respondents to a 2018 survey), they collaborated to agree on two capable co-chairs that were gender, culturally, and intersectionally diverse. These are also now in use at the University of Manchester.

During the setup of a new data analytics group at the University of Melbourne, I recognised there was no cultural diversity in the interview panel. I reached out to my network of culturally diverse colleagues and in many interviews we had one or more culturally diverse interviewers. The result was that we ended up having 44% of the initial recruitment being culturally diverse with multiple people from intersectionally marginalised groups.

I organically built a very diverse software engineering team that at one point consisted of 4 women (including 3 students and 3 women of colour) and myself. These experiences shaped my thoughts on workforce planning and diversity and inclusion in organisations.

 

Data Analytics

These are the number of views for the resources that are located on figshare.

Positive Feedback Received

“Rowland has insights about opportunity and inclusion that have potential to change how you think.” – Vanessa Sochat

“It’s really useful to have this all so clearly written out, and have a clear pathway for improving diversity, and why that’s important.” – Nick Golding, member of the Research Software Engineering interim steering committee.

“So much respect to you for undertaking a challenging feat to open up difficult conversations. These conversations are extremely important and it’s a shame they are not a part of occupational health and safety procedures.” – Priyanka Pillai

“As a stupendously privileged white male whose life has essentially gone the easy-route to success, I would like to compliment you on this work. Seriously.” – Sven Dowideit

“Thank you for spending the time and mental effort to articulate these uncomfortable truths so clearly in front of an audience that needs to hear it.” – Anonymous

“I was truly grateful to have a safe space to ask my awkward questions. And, I am very grateful for your kindness and feedback.” – Anonymous

“Fantastic talk, Rowland! So grateful for the real people example! It’s amazing how much more this presentation talk[s] to me than some random theoretical talk!” – Anonymous

“Your presentation on diversity/inclusion really got me thinking and I was wondering if it’s possible to get a copy of your slides please. There were some really good, practical ideas and I didn’t have time to write them all down.” – Anonymous

“Thank you so much Rowland, even in spite of “content warning” – it looks like you can never get prepared enough in these vulnerable things” – Anonymous